ALEUTIAN TRENCH CORE STUDY - Three members of the scientific staff on Leg 18 of the Deep Sea Drilling Project, left to right, Sherwood W. Wise, Jr., of Zurich, Switzerland; James C. Ingle, of Stanford University, and Hans-Joachim Schrader of Kiel, West Germany, study samples of a core recovered on the Aleutian Trench. The core was taken in 16,152 feet of water after a penetration of 98 feet into the ocean floor. It was Uppermost Pleistocene - approximately a half million years old. The core contained diatoms (marine algae) and radiolaria (marine plankton). To the eye, the core was sticky gray clay with fine sand. Schrader is taking a 10cc sample in a polyethylene tube for further study. 1972

Chicago citation style
Deep Sea Drilling Project. ALEUTIAN TRENCH CORE STUDY - Three members of the scientific staff on Leg 18 of the Deep Sea Drilling Project, left to right, Sherwood W. Wise, Jr., of Zurich, Switzerland; James C. Ingle, of Stanford University, and Hans-Joachim Schrader of Kiel, West Germany, study samples of a core recovered on the Aleutian Trench. The core was taken in 16,152 feet of water after a penetration of 98 feet into the ocean floor. It was Uppermost Pleistocene - approximately a half million years old. The core contained diatoms (marine algae) and radiolaria (marine plankton). To the eye, the core was sticky gray clay with fine sand. Schrader is taking a 10cc sample in a polyethylene tube for further study. 1972. 1972. Retrieved from the Digital Public Library of America, https://library.ucsd.edu/dc/object/bb75096375. (Accessed December 16, 2018.)
APA citation style
Deep Sea Drilling Project, (1972) ALEUTIAN TRENCH CORE STUDY - Three members of the scientific staff on Leg 18 of the Deep Sea Drilling Project, left to right, Sherwood W. Wise, Jr., of Zurich, Switzerland; James C. Ingle, of Stanford University, and Hans-Joachim Schrader of Kiel, West Germany, study samples of a core recovered on the Aleutian Trench. The core was taken in 16,152 feet of water after a penetration of 98 feet into the ocean floor. It was Uppermost Pleistocene - approximately a half million years old. The core contained diatoms (marine algae) and radiolaria (marine plankton). To the eye, the core was sticky gray clay with fine sand. Schrader is taking a 10cc sample in a polyethylene tube for further study. 1972. Retrieved from the Digital Public Library of America, https://library.ucsd.edu/dc/object/bb75096375
MLA citation style
Deep Sea Drilling Project. Retrieved from the Digital Public Library of America <https://library.ucsd.edu/dc/object/bb75096375>.
Note: These citations are programmatically generated and may be incomplete.