• “Frederick Law Olmsted, 1822-1903.” Courtesy of the Public Library of Brookline via Digital Commonwealth.

    More info
    Select an item:
    Frederick Law Olmsted 1822-1903
    • Date
    • 1984
    • Description
    • Title from item or accompanying materials. Date from item.
    • Rights
    • Rights status not evaluated. This work is licensed for use under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives License (CC BY-NC-ND).
    • Partner
    • Digital Commonwealth
    • Contributing Institution
    • Public Library of Brookline

  • "Martel's New York Central Park," 1864.  Courtesy of The New York Public Library.

    More info
    Select an item:
    Martel's New York Central Park
    • Date
    • 1864
    • Creator
    • Geissler, J. C. Martel, Pierre (?).
    • Description
    • Artist is possibly Pierre Martel. Print is dedicated to the park commissioners.
    • Standardized Rights Statement
    • http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/NoC-US/1.0/
    • Partner
    • The New York Public Library
    • Contributing Institution
    • The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Print Collection. The New York Public Library

  • "Map of New York City from 50th Street to 127th Street: showing Central Park, Bloomingdale Village, Yorkville, and the southern part of Harlem," 1870. Courtesy of The New York Public Library.

    More info
    Select an item:
    Map of New York City from 50th Street to 127th Street : showing Central Park, Bloomingdale Village, Yorkville, and the southern part of Harlem
    • Date
    • 1870
    • Description
    • Scale not given. (W 74°00ʹ32ʺ--W 73°55ʹ42ʺ/N 40°48ʹ55ʺ--N 40°45ʹ10ʺ). Oriented with north to the right of sheet.
    • Standardized Rights Statement
    • http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/NoC-US/1.0/
    • Partner
    • The New York Public Library
    • Contributing Institution
    • Lionel Pincus and Princess Firyal Map Division. The New York Public Library

New York City's Central Park was, in some ways, the park that "started it all."

The first large landscaped public park in the nation, its creation grew out of democratic ideals of equal access, and it had a social and economic impact on the city that came to see it as an identifying focal point, as well as inspiring cities around the country to create their own urban parks.

In turn, it launched the landscape architecture career of Frederick Law Olmsted, a multi-talented, visionary thinker who would go on to design many more public parks and shape the approach of other park designers around the nation.