• "Map of Haverhill, Massachusetts," 1832. Courtesy of Boston Public Library via Digital Commonwealth.

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    Map of Haverhill, Massachusetts
    • Date
    • 1832
    • Creator
    • Gale, James
    • Description
    • Partial cadastral map showing names of land owners, roads, the Merrimack River, other drainage, parish divisions, vegetation, and names of surrounding towns in New Hampshire and Massachusetts. Relief shown by shading and hachures. Includes list of di... more
      Partial cadastral map showing names of land owners, roads, the Merrimack River, other drainage, parish divisions, vegetation, and names of surrounding towns in New Hampshire and Massachusetts. Relief shown by shading and hachures. Includes list of distances from Haverhill Bridge. less
    • Rights
    • No known copyright restrictions. No known restrictions on use.
    • Partner
    • Digital Commonwealth
    • Contributing Institution
    • Boston Public Library

  • "Haverhill, Mass : 1876." This map of Haverhill, is a typical of a “bird’s-eye view” map, which emphasized aesthetics over accuracy. Note the central illustration of the shoe industry. Courtesy of Boston Public Library via Digital Commonwealth.

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    Haverhill, Mass : 1876
    • Date
    • 1876
    • Creator
    • Bailey, H. H. (Howard Heston), 1836-1878
    • Description
    • Includes ill. Indexed for points of interest. Bird's-eye view. C.H. Vogt lith., Milwaukee, Wis. Printed by J. Knauber & Co. Drawn and pub. by H.H. Bailey & J.C. Hazen.
    • Rights
    • No known copyright restrictions. No known restrictions on use.
    • Partner
    • Digital Commonwealth
    • Contributing Institution
    • Boston Public Library

  • "Haverhill, Massachusetts: 1893." This map of Haverhill is typical of a “bird’s-eye view” map, which emphasized aesthetics over accuracy. Note the dominance of the shoe industry by this time. Courtesy of Boston Public Library via Digital Commonwealth.

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    Haverhill, Massachusetts: 1893
    • Date
    • 1893
    • Creator
    • O.H. Bailey & Co
    • Description
    • Haverhill, located on the north side of the Merrimack River, is depicted from the south in this colorful bird's eye view. This composition focuses on the city's waterfront and central business district. Several larger factories, located near the rail... more
      Haverhill, located on the north side of the Merrimack River, is depicted from the south in this colorful bird's eye view. This composition focuses on the city's waterfront and central business district. Several larger factories, located near the railroad tracks and small tributary Little Rive rare positioned just left of center. However, the true nature of the city's industrial and commercial activity is captured in the marginal insets. Of the sixty-four vignettes, twenty-eight depicted boot, shoe, and slipper manufacturers while one portrayed a hat factory. Next to Lynn and Brockton, Haverhill was the state's third most important producer of footwear, primarily fine ladies shoes. The marginal insets, along with the legend's twenty-six entries, provide a more balanced image of the city's social and cultural life than many of the bird's eye views did for other industrial towns. They identified several public buildings, including the city hall, public library, and high school, which were pictured at the top center. Flanking these images are six churches. One of these was the French Catholic Church providing evidence of the French-Canadian population, one of the major immigrant groups that came to New England communities to work in the factories. In addition, there are pictures of seven private residences, most likely of the citys wealthiest citizens, but also the birthplace of poet John Greenleaf Whittier. Bird's-eye view. Includes ill. and index to points of interest. less
    • Rights
    • No known copyright restrictions. No known restrictions on use.
    • Partner
    • Digital Commonwealth
    • Contributing Institution
    • Boston Public Library

With the onset of industrialization and the machinery that came with it, Massachusetts' cities grew exponentially in urban development and population. One prevalent example is Haverhill, Massachusetts, and the striking expansion that resulted from its industrialization in the 1850s.

Haverhill had few settlements along its sinuous river in the 1830s. By the mid 1870s, broad avenues and streets began forming an urban grid that expanded throughout the town. Its growth continued through the turn of the twentieth century; the town, with its burgeoning industrial center, became known as “Queen Slipper City,” and produced a tenth of the nation’s shoes by the end of 1913 (an industry that dominates the advertisements on the quickly-changing maps of Haverhill itself).