• "Slums" in Washington, DC.

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    Slums. Washington, D.C.
    • Date
    • 1935-11
    • Creator
    • Mydans, Carl
    • Rights
    • No known restrictions. For information, see U.S. Farm Security Administration/Office of War Information Black & White Photographs(http://www.loc.gov/rr/print/res/071_fsab.html)
    • Partner
    • Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, DC 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print
    • Is Part Of
    • Farm Security Administration - Office of War Information Photograph Collection (Library of Congress)

  • Interview with Dossie Acklin (excerpt). Mr. Acklin was born December 19, 1910 in Pico, Alabama. In this interview Acklin discusses his life as a young black man growing up in Alabama, his education, sharecropping, and working as a farmer. He recounts life during the Great Depression .... [and] different programs that came about during the time of Roosevelt such as Social Security, WPA, CCC, etc. Courtesy of Eastern Kentucky University. [This is an audio file only.]

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    Interview with Dossie Acklin (excerpt)
    • Date
    • 1992
    • Creator
    • Boker, Alicia; Acklin, Dossie
    • Description
    • Dossie Acklin was born December 19, 1910 in Pico, Alabama. In this interview Acklin discusses his life as a young black man growing up in Alabama, his education, sharecropping, and working as a farmer. He recounts life during the Great Depression whi... more
      Dossie Acklin was born December 19, 1910 in Pico, Alabama. In this interview Acklin discusses his life as a young black man growing up in Alabama, his education, sharecropping, and working as a farmer. He recounts life during the Great Depression which he felt was due to the poor administration under President Hoover. He explains how his family survived during the Depression by raising their own food and how living in the country benefited them during this time because they had access to food. He discusses memories he had from that time and what people did for entertainment. He describes how life improved for everyone when President Roosevelt came into office and all of the helpful programs Roosevelt implemented to bring the Depression to an end. He discusses different programs that came about during the time of Roosevelt such as Social Security, W.P.A., C.C.C., etc. The interview concludes with Acklin discussing the closeness of families during the Depression, the opportunities that young blacks have today that were unavailable during his youth, and quotations from the Bible. less
    • Rights
    • Courtesy of Eastern Kentucky Library
    • Partner
    • Eastern Kentucky University; Kentucky Digital Library

  • The Pine River Journal (Pine River, Minnesota), 1935-09-12. Contains articles about employment programs and other Depression-era topics.

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    The Pine River Journal (Pine River, Minnesota), 1935-09-12
    • Rights
    • Use of these materials is governed by U.S. and international copyright law. Please contact Heritage Group North for more information.
    • Partner
    • Heritage Group North, P.O. Box 266, Pine River, Minnesota 56474 www.heritagegroupnorth.org; Minnesota Digital Library

  • New Deal industrial recovery. Photomontage.

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    New Deal industrial recovery. Photomontage
    • Date
    • ca.1920/ca. 1950
    • Creator
    • Horydczak, Theodor, ca. 1890-1971
    • Rights
    • Publication may be restricted. For information see "Horydczak Collection" (http://lcweb.loc.gov/rr/print/res/100_hory.html)
    • Partner
    • Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, DC 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print
    • Is Part Of
    • Horydczak, Theodor, ca. 1890-1971. Theodor Horydczak Collection (Library of Congress)

Unemployment, lack of access to bank funds, and a general collapse of world trade, meant many went hungry and homeless throughout the nation. Later, an environmental catastrophe known as the "Dust Bowl," affected thousands in the middle West of the United States, causing migrations illustrated in novels like John Steinbeck's, The Grapes of Wrath.

Particularly hard hit were African Americans and other minority populations, whose jobs were often taken away first and given to their white counterparts. In 1930, nearly 50% of black Americans were unemployed. It was this desperation -- from banking and manufacturing to unemployment and destitution -- that Roosevelt's New Deal meant to address.