• A photo of World War II Army veteran Mark Dale Rigby, 1944. Courtesy of the Newton Town Library via Mountain West Digital Library.

     

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    Rigby, M. Dale (1920-1998), veteran of World War II
    • Date
    • 1930-1946
    • Description
    • Mark Dale Rigby, Army. Fort McPherson Atlanta, Georgia. Central Dental Lab. December, 1944.
    • Rights
    • Copyright status unknown. These materials can be used for scholarly and educational purposes. If you have information about an item or its copyright status, please contact USU Libraries Special Collections and Archives at(435) 797-2663.
    • Partner
    • Mountain West Digital Library
    • Contributing Institution
    • Newton Town (UT) Library

  • “Soldier and family,” 1943. Courtesy of the Special Collections and Archives, Georgia State University Library via Digital Library of Georgia.

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    Soldier and Family
    • Date
    • 1943
    • Creator
    • Lane Brothers Commercial Photographers (Atlanta, Ga.)
    • Description
    • Photo commissioned by DeKalb New Era. Envelope description: DeKalb New Era; Contest. Local identification number: LBCE75f. Lane Brothers Commercial Photographers Photographic Collection, 1920-1976, Special Collections and Archives, Georgia State Univ... more
      Photo commissioned by DeKalb New Era. Envelope description: DeKalb New Era; Contest. Local identification number: LBCE75f. Lane Brothers Commercial Photographers Photographic Collection, 1920-1976, Special Collections and Archives, Georgia State University Library. less
    • Rights
    • Http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/. Cite as: LBCE75f, Lane Brothers Commercial Photographers Photographic Collection, 1920-1976. Photographic Collection, Special Collections and Archives, Georgia State University Library. This Item is pro... more
      Http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/. Cite as: LBCE75f, Lane Brothers Commercial Photographers Photographic Collection, 1920-1976. Photographic Collection, Special Collections and Archives, Georgia State University Library. This Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. You are free to use this Item in any way that is permitted by the copyright and related rights legislation that applies to your use. In addition, no permission is required from the rights-holder(s) for educational uses. For other uses, you need to obtain permission from the rights-holder(s). less
    • Partner
    • Digital Library of Georgia
    • Contributing Institution
    • Georgia State University. Libraries. Special Collections

  • An oral history interview with Lewis R. Hopkins, a soldier from Georgia, who discusses moving across the country for a West Coast post after the bombing of Pearl Harbor. He was "surreptitiously" married, since enlisted men could not be married at the time. Courtesy of the National Museum of the Pacific War/Admiral Nimitz Foundation via The Portal to Texas History.

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    Oral History Interview with Lewis R. Hopkins, January 15, 2004
    • Date
    • 2004-01-15
    • Creator
    • Cox, Floyd. Hopkins, Lewis R.
    • Description
    • Interview with Lewis R. Hopkins, a pilot during World War II. He describes growing up on a farm in Georgia, going to college at Berry, and working for Sears, Roebuck, and the Royal Typewriter Company before joining the U. S. Navy. He tells an anecdot... more
      Interview with Lewis R. Hopkins, a pilot during World War II. He describes growing up on a farm in Georgia, going to college at Berry, and working for Sears, Roebuck, and the Royal Typewriter Company before joining the U. S. Navy. He tells an anecdote about joining the navy so he could go to New York to see the World's Fair, since he had heard the Atlanta Reserve would be making a trip to the Fair. He began flight training in Florida in December 1940, finished the next September, then drove cross-country to San Francisco after the Pearl Harbor attack. He eventually joined the USS Enterprise in April 1942 and saw the B-25 bombers in the Doolittle Raid take off. He was part of Bombing Squadron Six and trained under Commander Best to learn how to do scouting flights, navigation, and dive bombing. He then describes his participation in the Battle of Midway, the hours before take-off, his first view of the Japanese fleet, and his bombing mission. He was later assigned to the USS Hornet and had to fly off to a little island so that planes from the USS Wasp could land on the Hornet after their ship had been torpedoed. He contracted malaria while he was on the island. He transferred to the USS Northhampton, then back to the United States to train pilots in dive-bombing at Jacksonville, Florida. He then received post-graduate training in aeronautical engineering at Annapolis and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in order to research and develop aircraft logistics. 1 sound recording : digital. less
    • Rights
    • The contents of The Portal to Texas History (digital content including images, text, and sound and video recordings) are made publicly available by the collection-holding partners for use in research, teaching, and private study. For the full terms o... more
      The contents of The Portal to Texas History (digital content including images, text, and sound and video recordings) are made publicly available by the collection-holding partners for use in research, teaching, and private study. For the full terms of use, see https://texashistory.unt.edu/terms-of-use/ less
    • Partner
    • The Portal to Texas History
    • Contributing Institution
    • National Museum of the Pacific War/Admiral Nimitz Foundation.

  • Two military patients playing horseshoes at the Georgia Warm Springs Foundation in Georgia, ca. 1940s. Courtesy of the Roosevelt Warm Springs Institute for Rehabilitation via Digital Library of Georgia.

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    Photograph of two military patients playing a game of horseshoes on the quadrangle of the Georgia Warm Springs Foundation, Warm Springs, Meriwether County, Georgia, 1940-1950?
    • Date
    • 1940/1950
    • Description
    • A photograph of two military patients playing a game of horseshoes on the quadrangle of the Georgia Warm Springs Foundation, Warm Springs, Meriwether County, Georgia, sometime between 1940 and 1950. Roosevelt Warm Springs/Georgia Warm Springs Foundat... more
      A photograph of two military patients playing a game of horseshoes on the quadrangle of the Georgia Warm Springs Foundation, Warm Springs, Meriwether County, Georgia, sometime between 1940 and 1950. Roosevelt Warm Springs/Georgia Warm Springs Foundation Photograph Collection, Roosevelt Warm Springs Vocational Rehabilitation Campus, Warm Springs, Georgia. less
    • Rights
    • Http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/. Cite as: [title of item], Selections from the Records of the Georgia Warm Springs Foundation, 1924-1974, Roosevelt Warm Springs Vocational Rehabilitation Campus, presented in the Digital Library of Georgia.... more
      Http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/. Cite as: [title of item], Selections from the Records of the Georgia Warm Springs Foundation, 1924-1974, Roosevelt Warm Springs Vocational Rehabilitation Campus, presented in the Digital Library of Georgia. Please contact the Roosevelt Warm Springs Vocational Rehabilitation Campus re: reproduction and usage. less
    • Partner
    • Digital Library of Georgia
    • Contributing Institution
    • Roosevelt Warm Springs Vocational Rehabilitation Campus

During World War II, sixteen million men and women fought in the war, and twenty-four million more worked in defense-related jobs. The war removed soldiers from their families for long periods of time, and made it difficult to remain connected by shared experiences despite the frequent exchange of correspondence.

Soldiers overseas looked forward to the time when they would be brought back together with their families after deployment. Georgia’s Fort McPherson operated a separation facility with three telephone centers where military men and women awaiting processing for furloughs or discharges contacted their families upon their arrival back in the United States.

But often, joyful reunions were soon followed by a series of new challenges: veterans returned to housing shortages, and disabled veterans had to appeal to Congress for appropriate compensation. Inside the home, servicemen were alienated from the routines their families had established independently while they were away at war. Since the dynamic of many homes had adapted to function without the presence of a loved one at war, when soldiers returned, they not only had to find ways to reconnect with their families, but also redefine the roles they had previously held prior to leaving for war.