• A Ferron, Utah CCC member on a bulldozer working on building roads, 1935. Courtesy of the Emery County Archives via Mountain West Digital Library

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    Civilian Conservation Corps--Ferron--Camp F-11 Company 959--Bulldozer Building Roads
    • Date
    • 1935
    • Description
    • Before the CCCs could work on most of their conservation projects, they had to build roads into the areas first. The hard working boys were promoted to CAT operators and truck drivers. Photographs.
    • Rights
    • Digital image c2009 Emery County Archives. All rights reserved.
    • Partner
    • Mountain West Digital Library
    • Contributing Institution
    • Emery County (UT) Archives

  • "Pleasant Grove Camp Airmen," ca. 1942. The Pleasant Grove CCC Camp was converted to a military training facility at the onset of World War II. Courtesy of the Utah State Historical Society via Mountain West Digital Library.

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    Pleasant Grove Camp Airmen
    • Date
    • 1938
    • Creator
    • Utah State Historical Society
    • Description
    • Image shows a company of army airmen marching along a Utah road near the site of the Pleasant Grove CCC Camp. The Pleasant Grove Camp was quickly converted to a military training facility at the onset of World War II.
    • Rights
    • Digital Image © 2003 Utah State Historical Society. All Rights Reserved.
    • Partner
    • Mountain West Digital Library
    • Contributing Institution
    • Utah State Historical Society

  • "Civilian Conservation Corps crew working on East Bearskin Road, north of Grand Marais, Minnesota," 1934. Courtesy of the Cook County Historical Society via Minnesota Digital Library.

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    Civilian Conservation Corps crew working on East Bearskin Road, north of Grand Marais, Minnesota

  • "Civilian Conservation Corps employees moving a building manually at Green Lakes State Park,” ca. 1930s-40s. Courtesy of the Fayetteville Free Library via Empire State Digital Network.

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    Civilian Conservation Corps employees moving a building manually at Green Lakes State Park, 1 of 2
    • Date
    • 1929-1948
    • Creator
    • Almquist, Arvin H., 1901-1959.
    • Description
    • The Almquist Green Lakes Collection contains photos of the building of Green Lakes State Park taken by the original park superintendent, Arvin H. Almquist. Caption reads, "Hup, Two, Three." Step to your Right or she'll go over!
    • Rights
    • This image has been dedicated to the public domain by the copyright holder. There are no restrictions on the use of this digital resource, but a citation including the collection, the holding institution, and the digital repository should accompany a... more
      This image has been dedicated to the public domain by the copyright holder. There are no restrictions on the use of this digital resource, but a citation including the collection, the holding institution, and the digital repository should accompany any further publication or distribution. Prefered citation for this material is as follows: "Almquist Green Lakes Collection, Local History Department, Fayetteville Free Library, http://nyheritage.org. less
    • Partner
    • Empire State Digital Network
    • Contributing Institution
    • Fayetteville Free Library
      Central New York Library Resources Council

End of the Program and World War II

Towards the end of the 1930s, there was starting to be less demand for the work relief programs provided by the CCC. The improved economy in the late 30s also led to increased desertion among the CCC men. There were also isolated incidents of revolts or refusal to work in a small number of camps. The sudden death of the director of the CCC Robert Fechner in 1939 also contributed to administrative difficulties within the program.

The military involvement with the CCC had occasionally been a source of tension between those who viewed the program solely as a work relief program and those who saw opportunities for recruitment of young men for the military. In response to the war in Europe, in the early 1940s the CCC camps were also doing basic military drills in addition to their regular work.

The Army benefited greatly with practices of logistics, transportation, and discipline through managing the CCC. The men of the CCC who enlisted in World War II were already used to military discipline and having to live and work alongside a variety of other men. CCC camps helped with logistical support on military bases in the early 1940s. After the bombing of Pearl Harbor, the CCC camps that were not contributing to the military effort were closed. Funding for the program was eliminated in 1942.