• "Photograph of a Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) Man Standing on a Plank on a Tree Trunk with a Drill," ca. 1935. Courtesy of the National Archives and Records Administration.

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    Photograph of a Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) Man Standing on a Plank on a Tree Trunk with a Drill
    • Creator
    • Department of Agriculture. Forest Service. Region 6 (North Pacific Region). 1930-1966.
    • Rights
    • Unrestricted
    • Partner
    • National Archives and Records Administration
    • Contributing Institution
    • National Archives at Seattle

  • Civilian Conservation Corps “boys at work” in Beltsville, Maryland, 1935. Courtesy of the New York Public Library.

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    CCC (Civilian Conservation Corps) boys at work. Beltsville, Maryland
    • Date
    • 1935 Nov
    • Creator
    • Mydans, Carl.
    • Description
    • Farm Security Administration stamp, typed caption, and manuscript Resettlement Administration number and other notations on verso. Photo Source stamp on recto. Title and date from caption on verso and from FSA-OWI caption sheet; identified as "killed... more
      Farm Security Administration stamp, typed caption, and manuscript Resettlement Administration number and other notations on verso. Photo Source stamp on recto. Title and date from caption on verso and from FSA-OWI caption sheet; identified as "killed.". Not in LC. Beltsville / Prince Georges / Maryland. PR 11. less
    • Standardized Rights Statement
    • http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/NoC-US/1.0/
    • Partner
    • The New York Public Library
    • Contributing Institution
    • The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection. The New York Public Library

  • "Group of CCC boys from Idaho just arrived in camp near Andersonville, Tennessee,” 1933. These CCC units conducted reforestation work on the Clinch River watershed. Courtesy of the National Archives and Records Administration.

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    "Group of CCC boys from Idaho just arrived in camp near Andersonville, Tennessee. The CCC units are to assist in the reforestation work on the Clinch River watershed above the Dam."
    • Creator
    • Tennessee Valley Authority. 1933-9999.
    • Rights
    • Unrestricted
    • Partner
    • National Archives and Records Administration
    • Contributing Institution
    • National Archives at College Park - Still Pictures

  • “Two CCC Buddies" at a camp in Ferron, Utah, 1935. Courtesy of the Emery County Archives via Mountain West Digital Library.

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    Civilian Conservation Corps -- Ferron -- Camp F-11 Company 959 -- Owen Price -- Two CCC Buddies
    • Date
    • 1935
    • Creator
    • Price, Owen
    • Description
    • The Civilian Conservation Corps took young men from ages 18 - 22 years old. The average age nation wide was 18.5 years, so they were referred to as the CCC Boys. One former member recalls, "They must have had warehouses full of Army surplus uniforms,... more
      The Civilian Conservation Corps took young men from ages 18 - 22 years old. The average age nation wide was 18.5 years, so they were referred to as the CCC Boys. One former member recalls, "They must have had warehouses full of Army surplus uniforms, and it was one size fits all." Another remembers, "It seems like they always gave you a size bigger than you needed. If you complained about it, they would say, 'Don't worry about it, you're going to grow into it.'" The CCC was started during the Great Depression, so most of these boys had not been fed three meals a day, especially with dessert each day. The average weight gain per boy was 12 lbs. the first month. Photographs. less
    • Rights
    • Digital image c2009 Emery County Archives. All rights reserved.
    • Partner
    • Mountain West Digital Library
    • Contributing Institution
    • Emery County (UT) Archives

Young men in the camps were paid thirty dollars per month, or one dollar per day. Twenty-five dollars a month was sent home to help their families and they were allowed to keep the rest for their own spending. The additional support sent home to the families of the CCC meant that the economic impact of the relief work was dispersed across the country. While the camps were originally set to house younger men, the government raised age limits in order to raise enrollment. Camp leaders were able to earn an extra fifteen dollars per month and assistant leaders earned an extra six dollars per month. Unemployed World War I veterans were also able to enlist in separate camps where there were fewer restrictions.

The majority of the CCC enrollees were young, white men. Some integrated camps allowed African Americans to enroll in the program, but as the CCC progressed, it developed a small number of segregated camps for African Americans. Native Americans also participated in a separate program in the CCC’s “Indian Division.”