• “Newton, Utah Boy Scout troop in Logan Canyon,” 1920s. Courtesy of the Newton Town (UT) Library via Mountain West Digital Library.

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    Newton, Utah Boy Scout troop in Logan Canyon
    • Date
    • 1922-1928
    • Description
    • Scout hike to Logan Canyon. Right to Left; Marcus Griffin, Trevor Clarke, Oswald Clarke, Tom Griffin (background), John Rolph, La Voir Dowdle, Marvin Benson, J. J. Larsen, David Stone, La Vell Parsons, Ed Larsen, Earl Jorgensen, Francis Peterson. Dur... more
      Scout hike to Logan Canyon. Right to Left; Marcus Griffin, Trevor Clarke, Oswald Clarke, Tom Griffin (background), John Rolph, La Voir Dowdle, Marvin Benson, J. J. Larsen, David Stone, La Vell Parsons, Ed Larsen, Earl Jorgensen, Francis Peterson. During one hike to Logan Canyon one of the scouts fell down and as a result sustained a sprained ankle. Being very resourceful J.J. Larsen had the boys find two straight, strong, large branches and thread their shirt sleeves on the logs to make a makeshift stretcher to transport there injured scout down the mountain. less
    • Rights
    • This item is in the public domain and as such may be freely used without restriction.
    • Partner
    • Mountain West Digital Library
    • Contributing Institution
    • Newton Town (UT) Library

  • “Photograph of Boy Scouts gathered around a park sign, Chattahoochee National Forest, Georgia, 1953.” Courtesy of the Clarkesville-Habersham Library via Digital Library of Georgia.

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    Photograph of Boy Scouts gathered around a park sign, Chattahoochee National Forest, Georgia, 1953
    • Date
    • 1953
    • Description
    • Photograph of Boy Scouts gathered around a park sign at Chatahoochee National Forest, Georgia, 1953. This photograph is from a scrapbook submitted to Georgia Power's 1953 Champion Home Town contest. The contest was extended to towns with populations ... more
      Photograph of Boy Scouts gathered around a park sign at Chatahoochee National Forest, Georgia, 1953. This photograph is from a scrapbook submitted to Georgia Power's 1953 Champion Home Town contest. The contest was extended to towns with populations under 20,000. The photos document the towns' progress in the areas of education, industry, recreation, youth, clubs and societies, complete with brief written progress reports. Clarkesville-Habersham Library, Clarkesville, Georgia. less
    • Rights
    • Http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/NoC-US/1.0/
    • Partner
    • Digital Library of Georgia
    • Contributing Institution
    • Clarkesville-Habersham Library

  • “Photograph of African American Boy Scout with a trumpet, Atlanta, Georgia,” ca. 1942. This scout was a member of an all-African American troop. Courtesy of the Auburn Avenue Research Library on African American Culture and History via Digital Library of Georgia.

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    Photograph of African American Boy Scout with a trumpet, Atlanta, Georgia
    • Date
    • 1942/1945
    • Description
    • Photograph of African American Boy Scout in uniform with a trumpet, Atlanta, Georgia. Box 49, Series II, Edward Randolph Carter and Andrew Jackson Lewis collection. Archives Division, Auburn Avenue Research Library on African-American Culture and His... more
      Photograph of African American Boy Scout in uniform with a trumpet, Atlanta, Georgia. Box 49, Series II, Edward Randolph Carter and Andrew Jackson Lewis collection. Archives Division, Auburn Avenue Research Library on African-American Culture and History, Atlanta-Fulton Public Library System. less
    • Rights
    • Https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
    • Partner
    • Digital Library of Georgia
    • Contributing Institution
    • Auburn Avenue Research Library on African-American Culture and History

  • From a 1942 Boy Scout pamphlet from Atlanta, Georgia: “Negro Boy Scouts take their place in Atlanta and with Uncle Sam.” Courtesy of the Auburn Avenue Research Library on African American Culture and History via Digital Library of Georgia.

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    Negro Boy Scouts Take Their Place in Atlanta and With Uncle Sam

In 1910, the Boy Scouts, founded by Robert Baden-Powell in Britain, came to the United States. A youth organization focused on service, citizenship, and outdoor skills, the Scout law proclaimed that "a scout is trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean, and reverent." The Boy Scouts of America sought to bring urban youths into the natural environment and away from the corrupting influences of the city. Boys were awarded with badges for achievement in outdoor skills and crafts.

Principles of good citizenship were instilled in the Scouts. Only three years after the formation of the national organization, the Boy Scouts served as crowd control for both the 1913 parade for Women's suffrage in Washington D.C., and President Woodrow Wilson's inauguration. Like adults on the home front during World War I and World War II, children participated in war efforts, and the Boy Scouts were active in collecting scrap metal and rags, and purchasing war bonds.

Although the Boy Scouts program did not deny membership on the basis of race, its troop formation followed the segregation policies of local schools. As a result, segregated troops existed through the 1940s.