• Lawrence strike meeting, New York.

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    Lawrence strike meeting, New York
    • Date
    • 1912
    • Creator
    • Bain News Service, publisher
    • Rights
    • No known restrictions on publication.
    • Partner
    • Library of Congress ; Digital Commonwealth

  • Lawrence, Mass., strikers parading in New York City.

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    Lawrence, Mass strikers parading in N.Y.C.
    • Date
    • 1912
    • Creator
    • Bain News Service, publisher
    • Rights
    • No known restrictions on publication.
    • Partner
    • Library of Congress ; Digital Commonwealth

  • Lawrence children in front of Old Labor Hall, Barre, Vermont.

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    Lawrence children in front of Old Labor Hall, Barre, Vermont
    • Date
    • 1912
    • Rights
    • The rights to this image may be restricted.
    • Partner
    • Aldrich Public Library (Barre, Vermont); Digital Commonwealth

  • "Help! Help! They Are Murdering Us," poster.

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    Poster: Help! Help! They Are Murdering Us
    • Date
    • 1912
    • Creator
    • 1912 Strike Committee
    • Rights
    • The rights to this image may be restricted. Contact the Lawrence History Center for more information.
    • Partner
    • Lawrence History Center; Digital Commonwealth
    • Contributing Institution
    • Lawrence History Center

Throughout the strike, sympathetic actions were held in cities and towns across the nation. Meetings were held up and down the East Coast and Mid-Atlantic region. Beyond Lawrence, the most active workers to take up the cause were in New York City. Unions, political parties, and sympathetic organizations would hold daily gatherings to keep each other updated on the events occurring in Lawrence. These assemblies often entailed the passing of resolutions, raising of funds to be sent to Lawrence strikers, and the organizing of acts of solidarity in their respective locales.

The workers of New York City were very interested in the events of the strike. When Lawrence strikers' children were sent to the city during the "children's exodus", sympathetic New Yorkers jumped at the chance to have the honor of hosting a Lawrence child. On the day of their arrival in the city, a crowd of a thousand people met the strikers' children at Grand Central Station and led a solidarity parade through the streets of the city. Lawrence children were also sent to other places like Philadelphia and Barre, Vermont.