• CLOSE PLAY AT FIRST, FENWAY PARK, 1934. Leslie Jones Collection, BPL Print Department

    The Green Monster, Fenway's left field wall, remains one of the most famous features in any professional sports venue. It was constructed from concrete, covered in tin, and clad in green-painted wood. 

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    Close play at first, Fenway Park
    • Date
    • 1934
    • Creator
    • Jones, Leslie, 1886-1967
    • Description
    • Unknown Boston Red Sox pitcher races to cover first base and just beats unknown New York Yankee base runner to the bag for the out at Fenway Park.
    • Rights
    • Copyright © Leslie Jones.; This work is licensed for use under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives License.
    • Partner
    • Boston Public Library; Digital Commonwealth
    • Contributing Institution
    • Boston Public Library
    • Is Part Of
    • Leslie Jones Collection

  • RED SOX OUTFIELDER LEON CULBERSON LEAPS IN FRONT OF SCOREBOARD AT FENWAY PARK, 1943. Boston Herald-Traveler Photo Morgue, BPL Print Department. 

    Fenway Park's manually-operated scoreboard, added in 1934, is the last of its kind in the major leagues. 

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    Red Sox outfielder Leon Culberson leaps in front of scoreboard at Fenway Park
    • Date
    • 1943-05
    • Creator
    • Jones, Leslie, 1886-1967
    • Description
    • Newspaper caption on verso reads, "Culberson Knows How to Play His Hand and the former pride of Louisville shows how to prevent a grand slam during the practice session at Fenway Park. Leon is his first name and this is his first view of Boston... more
      Newspaper caption on verso reads, "Culberson Knows How to Play His Hand and the former pride of Louisville shows how to prevent a grand slam during the practice session at Fenway Park. Leon is his first name and this is his first view of Boston and Fenway Park, since he joined the Hose on the road." less
    • Rights
    • Under copyright.; All rights reserved.
    • Partner
    • Boston Public Library; Digital Commmonwealth
    • Contributing Institution
    • Boston Public Library
    • Is Part Of
    • Boston Herald-Traveler Photo Morgue; Sports: Bio; Print Department

  • BIG BASEBALL CROWD AT FENWAY PARK, 1924. Leslie Jones Collection, BPL Print Department.  

    When the ballpark first opened, it could hold 35,000 spectators in the stands and along the edge of the field. 

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    Crowd at Fenway Park
    • Date
    • 1924
    • Creator
    • Jones, Leslie, 1886-1967
    • Description
    • Big crowd to see the Red Sox, vendor in white jacket in upper center.
    • Rights
    • Copyright © Leslie Jones.; This work is licensed for use under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives License.
    • Partner
    • Boston Public Library; Digital Commonwealth
    • Contributing Institution
    • Boston Public Library
    • Is Part Of
    • Leslie Jones Collection

  • LIGHTS AT FENWAY PARK ON AT 4:30 BECAUSE OF SMOKE FROM FOREST FIRES IN CANADA, 1950. Boston Herald-Traveler Photo Morgue, BPL Print Department.

    The Red Sox were the fourteenth out of sixteen teams in the major leagues to hold night games. It was not until 1947 that lights regularly illuminated the park. 

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    Lights at Fenway Park on at 4:30 because of smoke from forest fires in Canada
    • Date
    • 9/27/50
    • Description
    • Fenway Park looked like this yesterday when the lights turned on at 4:30 p.m. during the Red Sox-Washington double header. Darkness was caused by smoke from Canadian forest fires.
    • Rights
    • Under copyright.; All rights reserved.
    • Partner
    • Boston Public Library; Digital Commmonwealth
    • Is Part Of
    • Boston Herald-Traveler Photo Morgue; Sports: Baseball: Ballparks: Fenway; Print Department

Built on mudflats at a cost of $650,000, Fenway Park was constructed in 1912 for the new American League team in town, the Boston Red Sox.  

One of the smallest parks in Major League Baseball, Fenway is beloved by Sox players and fans—if not opposing teams—for its quirky architectural features, storied past, and generations of poignant memories captured within its confines.