• "United Behind the Service Star poster," 1918. Courtesy of the Springfield College Archives and Special Collections via Digital Commonwealth.

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    United Behind the Service Star poster (c. 1918)
    • Date
    • 1918
    • Creator
    • Baker, Ernest Hamlin, 1889-1975
    • Description
    • In this World War I poster, seven soldiers are standing in the foreground and holding flags representing the seven organizations that compose the United War Work Campaign. In the background are soldiers marching and an American flag. Beneath the pict... more
      In this World War I poster, seven soldiers are standing in the foreground and holding flags representing the seven organizations that compose the United War Work Campaign. In the background are soldiers marching and an American flag. Beneath the picture are the words, “United Behind the Service Star – United War Work Campaign.” The emblems for the seven organizations line the bottom: the YMCA, YWCA, National Catholic War Council, Jewish Welfare Board, War Camp Community Service, American Library Association, and Salvation Army. The United War Work Campaign was started when President Woodrow Wilson suggested the separate American relief organizations "united their forthcoming appeals for funds." With the full support of the United States government, they planned to raise a total of $170,500,000 during the week of November 11, 1918 (coincidentally the day World War I ended), which they would then divide pro rata according to the percentage each of their seven budgets represented. At the time, this was the biggest drive for funds ever attempted. The poster’s artist, Ernest Hamlin Baker, was born in 1889 in Rhode Island. He was a self-taught illustrator who produced over three hundred covers for Time magazine during his seventeen-year tenure with them. He was also responsible for eleven covers for Fortune Magazine between 1929 and 1941. Baker became involved in Works Progress Association (WPA) programs during the 1930s. Scale is not 1:1 because item was digitized using a Canon EOS Rebel T1i. Extent describes frame size and should be updated once poster is removed from the frame; No master file exists as the poster was photographed through glass and is not of high quality; This poster was donated by Ronad G. Gallagher (SC alumnus - 1976) and his brothers, Tim (Class of 1978) and Don (Class of 1975) in honor of Ray Berte, his favorite Springfield College professor. less
    • Rights
    • Text and images are owned, held, or licensed by Springfield College and are available for personal, non-commercial, and educational use, provided that ownership is properly cited. A credit line is required and should read: Courtesy of Springfield Col... more
      Text and images are owned, held, or licensed by Springfield College and are available for personal, non-commercial, and educational use, provided that ownership is properly cited. A credit line is required and should read: Courtesy of Springfield College, Babson Library, Archives and Special Collections. Any commercial use without written permission from Springfield College is strictly prohibited. Other individuals or entities other than, and in addition to, Springfield College may also own copyrights and other propriety rights. The publishing, exhibiting, or broadcasting party assumes all responsibility for clearing reproduction rights and for any infringement of United States copyright law. Contact host institution for more information. less
    • Partner
    • Digital Commonwealth
    • Contributing Institution
    • Springfield College Archives and Special Collections

  • "Group of African-American children participating in Chicago YMCA clean-up campaign," 1919. Courtesy of The New York Public Library.

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    Group of African-American children participating in Chicago YMCA clean-up campaign.
    • Date
    • 1919
    • Description
    • Images of African Americans in the 19th Century.
    • Standardized Rights Statement
    • http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/UND/1.0/
    • Partner
    • The New York Public Library
    • Contributing Institution
    • Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Photographs and Prints Division. The New York Public Library

  • "YMCA Emergency Courses Poster," 1918. Courtesy of the Springfield College Archives and Special Collections via Digital Commonwealth.

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    YMCA Emergency Courses Poster (c. 1918)
    • Date
    • 1918
    • Creator
    • Springfield College
    • Description
    • This poster advertises three emergency courses offered by the International YMCA College, now called Springfield College, during World War I: the army work course, the boys’ work course, and the county work course. These courses, which took place b... more
      This poster advertises three emergency courses offered by the International YMCA College, now called Springfield College, during World War I: the army work course, the boys’ work course, and the county work course. These courses, which took place between January and July 1918, were meant to prepare men for work that aided the nation’s war effort. Geared toward secretaries, physical directors, and educational directors, the army work course prepared students for Normal Work among troops. The boys’ work course was meant for secretaries, boy scouts, and playground leaders, and it prepared them to work with boys forced into industry (the Fair Labor Standards Act did not pass until after World War I) and those suffering in warring countries. The final course prepared men for county work, which involved food conservation and the supervision of boys and farm workers. Springfield College first began offering these courses in 1917. The poster’s text is printed across an inverted red triangle, the school’s emblem. Along the top of the poster is a photograph of the students who completed the first army work course, which lasted from June to July 1917. In the lower right is a picture of the first county work course, which took place from July to August 1917. The final image, placed along the lower left side of the poster, shows an illustration of a boy crying next to a portrait of Carl B. Kern (class of 1907), an alumnus who was killed on June 3, 1917 “while engaged in an act of service.” Above the boy is the caption, “Every kid in town wuz friends to C.B.” After Kern's death, an endowment was established in his name at The Dayton Foundation. less
    • Rights
    • Text and images are owned, held, or licensed by Springfield College and are available for personal, non-commercial, and educational use, provided that ownership is properly cited. A credit line is required and should read: Courtesy of Springfield Col... more
      Text and images are owned, held, or licensed by Springfield College and are available for personal, non-commercial, and educational use, provided that ownership is properly cited. A credit line is required and should read: Courtesy of Springfield College, Babson Library, Archives and Special Collections. Any commercial use without written permission from Springfield College is strictly prohibited. Other individuals or entities other than, and in addition to, Springfield College may also own copyrights and other propriety rights. The publishing, exhibiting, or broadcasting party assumes all responsibility for clearing reproduction rights and for any infringement of United States copyright law. Contact host institution for more information. less
    • Partner
    • Digital Commonwealth
    • Contributing Institution
    • Springfield College Archives and Special Collections

The Young Men’s Christian Association, more commonly known as the YMCA, began as a community prayer group in Switzerland in 1844. As the organization grew and joined with a sister network, the YWCA, it became increasingly secular. By the twentieth century, the YMCA was working primarily in urban communities, offering Christian entertainment to deter youth from engaging in crime. YMCA members also mentored young participants by offering training in skills that would serve them in the labor force.

During World War I, the YMCA played an active role both at home in the United States and abroad. On the home front, the organization launched clean-up campaigns on the streets and offered courses in emergency action and food conservation during Herbert Hoover’s initiative to decrease food consumption and waste.