• "World War I Poster -- For Every Fighter a Woman Worker." Courtesy of the Springfield College Archives and Special Collections via Digital Commonwealth.

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    World War I Poster - For Every Fighter a Woman Worker
    • Date
    • 1914
    • Creator
    • Treidler, Adolph
    • Description
    • The poster shows a woman holding a plan in her right hand and what looks like a shell in her left. Behind her is a blue YMCA triangle. The right side of the poster has the words “For Every Fighter a Woman Worker” and “United War Work Campaign.... more
      The poster shows a woman holding a plan in her right hand and what looks like a shell in her left. Behind her is a blue YMCA triangle. The right side of the poster has the words “For Every Fighter a Woman Worker” and “United War Work Campaign.” The bottom reads, “Care for Her through The YWCA.” The World YWCA was founded through the convergence of a social activist Lady Mary Jane Kinnaird and the committed Christian Emma Robarts. Mary Jane Kinnaird, born in 1816, was a philanthropist committed to young women’s well being. The YWCA was also active early in the 20th century promoting women's access to healthcare and health education. In 1913 the YWCA debuted a Commission on Social Morality, and the group taught sex education, usually under the names "social education" or "social morality." The YWCA promoted frank discussion of sex in order to prepare young women to protect themselves from venereal disease, unwanted pregnancy, and prostitution, and they worked with the War Department during World War I, lecturing on sex education. The artist of this poster, Adolph Treidler was born in Westcliff, Colorado, and studied at the California School of Design. During World War I he designed numerous Liberty Loan and recruiting posters. During World War II he served as Chairman of the Pictorial Publicity Committee for the Society of Illustrators. less
    • Rights
    • Text and images are owned, held, or licensed by Springfield College and are available for personal, non-commercial, and educational use, provided that ownership is properly cited. A credit line is required and should read: Courtesy of Springfield Col... more
      Text and images are owned, held, or licensed by Springfield College and are available for personal, non-commercial, and educational use, provided that ownership is properly cited. A credit line is required and should read: Courtesy of Springfield College, Babson Library, Archives and Special Collections. Any commercial use without written permission from Springfield College is strictly prohibited. Other individuals or entities other than, and in addition to, Springfield College may also own copyrights and other propriety rights. The publishing, exhibiting, or broadcasting party assumes all responsibility for clearing reproduction rights and for any infringement of United States copyright law. Contact host institution for more information. less
    • Partner
    • Digital Commonwealth
    • Contributing Institution
    • Springfield College Archives and Special Collections

  • In 1918, six women war workers, representing thousands of others, were delegated to see President Woodrow Wilson and urge him to support the motion for an immediate passage of the federal suffrage amendment. These women were employed at Bethlehem Steel Company's plant at Newcastle, Pennsylvania. They supplemented their argument with the statement that women were serving the government in war industries and felt the urgent need for federal enfranchisement. Courtesy of the National Archives and Records Administration.

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    Women munition workers urge President to support suffrage bill. Six women war workers
    • Creator
    • War Department. 1789-9/18/1947.
    • Description
    • Full caption reads as follows: Women munition workers urge President to support suffrage bill. Six women war workers, representing thousands of others, were delegated to see President Wilson and urge him to support the motion for an immediate passage... more
      Full caption reads as follows: Women munition workers urge President to support suffrage bill. Six women war workers, representing thousands of others, were delegated to see President Wilson and urge him to support the motion for an immediate passage of the federal suffrage amendment. These women were employed at Bethlehem Steel Company's plant at Newcastle, Pennslyvania. They supplemented their argument with the statement that the women are serving the government in war industries and feel the urgent need of federal enfranchisement. From left to right: Miss Mary Gonzon, Mrs. Florence B. Hilles, Miss Lulu Patterson, Mrs. Marie McKensie, Miss Aida Walling and Mrs. Catherine Boyle. less
    • Rights
    • Copyright ; Photographs taken by commercial sources may be copyrighted. ; Restricted - Possibly.
    • Partner
    • National Archives and Records Administration
    • Contributing Institution
    • National Archives at College Park - Still Pictures

  • "World War I farmerettes pack peaches on a Virginia fruit farm in August, 1917." Courtesy of the National Archives and Records Administration.

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    World War I farmerettes pack peaches on a Virginia fruit farm in August, 1917.
    • Creator
    • Department of Agriculture. Office of the Secretary. Office of Information. 1925-ca. 1981.
    • Rights
    • Unrestricted.
    • Partner
    • National Archives and Records Administration
    • Contributing Institution
    • National Archives at College Park - Still Pictures

The Woman’s Land Army of America (WLAA) recruited more than 20,000 urban women to work on rural farms during World War I. Most had no experience working on farms, and were required to become quick studies in the agricultural world. Women learned to drive tractors, plow fields, plant, and harvest crops.

In the absence of the male laborers who had gone off to the front lines, women also took up roles in factories that traditionally employed men. The most common factories in which women labored produced ammunition and textilesindustries that directly supported the war effort. The success of women in such labor-driven sectors challenged the conventional perceptions of the woman’s role in American industry and society.