• WSB-TV newsfilm clip of United States president John F. Kennedy speaking about the Albany Movement, 1962 August 1.

    More info
    Select an item:
    WSB-TV newsfilm clip of United States president John F. Kennedy speaking about the Albany Movement, 1962 August 1
    • Date
    • 1962 August 1
    • Creator
    • WSB-TV (Television station : Atlanta, Ga.)
    • Description
    • In this WSB newsfilm clip, the president of the United States, John F. Kennedy, at a press conference on August 1, 1962, responds to a reporter's question about the protests in Albany, Georgia. President Kennedy states that he is staying update... more
      In this WSB newsfilm clip, the president of the United States, John F. Kennedy, at a press conference on August 1, 1962, responds to a reporter's question about the protests in Albany, Georgia. President Kennedy states that he is staying updated on the situation through reports from Attorney General Robert Kennedy. The President argues that the Albany City Commission's refusal to negotiate with African American citizens is "wholly inexplicable." President Kennedy conveys his administration's commitment to continue its efforts to secure the constitutional rights of the people of Albany, and that the current situation is "completely unsatisfactory." He goes on to express disappointment that while the United States was able to hold talks with the Soviet Union, the city commission will not work with Albany's African American citizens. less
    • Rights
    • Courtesy of Walter J. Brown Media Archives and Peabody Award Collection, The University of Georgia Libraries, Athens, Ga. Cite as: WSB-TV newsfilm clip of United States president John F. Kennedy speaking about the Albany Movement, 1962 August 1, WSB... more
      Courtesy of Walter J. Brown Media Archives and Peabody Award Collection, The University of Georgia Libraries, Athens, Ga. Cite as: WSB-TV newsfilm clip of United States president John F. Kennedy speaking about the Albany Movement, 1962 August 1, WSB-TV newsfilm collection, reel 0783, 29:27/30:29, Walter J. Brown Media Archives and Peabody Awards Collection, The University of Georgia Libraries, Athens, Ga. less
    • Partner
    • Walter J. Brown Media Archives and Peabody Awards Collection; Digital Library of Georgia
    • Contributing Institution
    • Walter J. Brown Media Archives and Peabody Awards Collection

  • WALB newsfilm clip of Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy leading a kneel-in and being arrested in Albany, Georgia, 1962 July 27.

    More info
    Select an item:
    WALB newsfilm clip of Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy leading a kneel-in and being arrested in Albany, Georgia, 1962 July 27
    • Date
    • 1962 July 27
    • Creator
    • WALB (Television station : Albany, Ga.)
    • Description
    • In this WALB newsfilm clip from July 27, 1962, Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy leads a kneel-in at city hall in Albany, Georgia, during which he prays for the community, its leaders, and the leaders of the civil rights movement before police arrest him a... more
      In this WALB newsfilm clip from July 27, 1962, Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy leads a kneel-in at city hall in Albany, Georgia, during which he prays for the community, its leaders, and the leaders of the civil rights movement before police arrest him and his fellow demonstrators. The clip begins with a silent portion in which groups of African Americans get out of cars near city hall and walk towards the building. Rev. Abernathy exits one of the cars in a group with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Dr. William G. Anderson, Slater King, and Reverend E. James Grant; president, vice president, and member of the Albany Movement respectively. The demonstrators line up in front of city hall and are met by local police, led by Albany police chief Laurie Pritchett. Pritchett gives directions to his officers and to those in the kneel-in as cameramen and reporters surround the group. The sound portion begins with Pritchett informing the demonstrators that they are under arrest. King appears to ignore the statement and asks Abernathy to pray. Abernathy prays for the city of Albany; the city officials, including the mayor and chief of police; and the members of the police force. Pritchett then interrupts the prayer, directing his officers to round up the demonstrators. Abernathy continues to pray for peace in the community, and for a willingness in the city officials to negotiate with the leaders of the African American community. He prays that those attending the kneel-in will not feel hate or animosity, and for their leaders by name, including Anderson, King, and Reverend Benjamin Gay, chaplain of the Albany Movement, who is not seen. The end of Abernathy's prayer is not recorded. The clip continues with Pritchett again informing the group that they will be arrested if they do not leave. The demonstrators begin to move towards city hall and King stops to give a reporter a prepared statement he did not get to read. The clip ends with cameramen and reporters watching the demonstrators enter city hall. Abernathy, King, Anderson, and others came to city hall with the goal of speaking to the city commission; when they were informed that the city commission would not meet with them before the next meeting scheduled for August 7, they began to pray. A second kneel-in, led by Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) leader Charles Jones, took place at city hall later in the day; the participants in that event were also arrested. less
    • Rights
    • Courtesy of Walter J. Brown Media Archives and Peabody Award Collection, The University of Georgia Libraries, Athens, Ga. Cite as: WALB newsfilm clip of Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy leading a kneel-in and being arrested in Albany, Georgia, 1962 July ... more
      Courtesy of Walter J. Brown Media Archives and Peabody Award Collection, The University of Georgia Libraries, Athens, Ga. Cite as: WALB newsfilm clip of Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy leading a kneel-in and being arrested in Albany, Georgia, 1962 July 27, Albany Movement compilation, WALB News Film collection, Albany Movement Compilation Roll 1 [Tape 1] less
    • Partner
    • Walter J. Brown Media Archives and Peabody Awards Collection; Digital Library of Georgia
    • Contributing Institution
    • Walter J. Brown Media Archives and Peabody Awards Collection

  • WSB-TV newsfilm clip of a press conference where Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy, and Albany Movement president Dr. William G. Anderson speak after King and Abernathy were mysteriously released from jail in Albany, Georgia, 1962 July 12.

    More info
    Select an item:
    WSB-TV newsfilm clip of a press conference where Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy, and Albany Movement president Dr. William G. Anderson speak after King and Abernathy were mysteriously released from jail in Albany, Georgia, 1962 July 12
    • Date
    • 1962 July 12
    • Creator
    • WSB-TV (Television station : Atlanta, Ga.)
    • Description
    • In this WSB newsfilm clip, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy, and Albany Movement president Dr. William G. Anderson speak at a press conference on July 12, 1962 upon their release from jail. Both King and Abernathy were release... more
      In this WSB newsfilm clip, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy, and Albany Movement president Dr. William G. Anderson speak at a press conference on July 12, 1962 upon their release from jail. Both King and Abernathy were released from serving a forty-five-day jail sentence when an unknown person purportedly paid their fines. King and Abernathy had been arrested in Albany, Georgia during a march in December 1961, and decided to serve time rather than pay a fine if they were found guilty. Albany city officials, aware of the media attention King received while in jail, arranged a plan and released the two leaders saying a "well-dressed Negro" had paid their fines. Although released from jail, Abernathy affirms that he and King will stay in Albany to continue working with the Albany Movement as private, concerned citizens interested in settlement and discussion of the dismissal of charges against seven hundred Albany citizens who had also been arrested. Anderson says that the Albany Movement is open to negotiations with the city of Albany. Behind King, Abernathy, and Anderson, Wyatt Walker, Executive Secretary for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) and Slater King, vice-president for the Albany Movement, are seen. City leaders repeatedly refused to negotiate while demonstrations persisted, but during the press conference, King asserts that the movement will not be intimidated into inaction or retreat. The concerns of the Albany Movement, according to King, will be resolved when the city of Albany accepts integration as the law of the land. Accepting the "Albany Manifesto" with its five proposals of the Albany Movement regarding the desegregation of parks, train and bus stations, and release of citizens arrested in the protests would be a temporary solution that would clear the way for discussion. King was, in part, upset because his own jail release had been accelerated by city officials (who paid his bail) in an attempt to minimize his publicity; he had been counting on serving the jail time to offset the criticism of other activists who claimed he was unwilling to suffer the discomforts that he encouraged others to endure for the movement. The clip ends with King speaking at a mass meeting held at Mt. Zion Baptist Church. less
    • Rights
    • Courtesy of Walter J. Brown Media Archives and Peabody Award Collection, The University of Georgia Libraries, Athens, Ga. Cite as: WSB-TV newsfilm clip of a press conference where Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy, and Albany ... more
      Courtesy of Walter J. Brown Media Archives and Peabody Award Collection, The University of Georgia Libraries, Athens, Ga. Cite as: WSB-TV newsfilm clip of a press conference where Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy, and Albany Movement president Dr. William G. Anderson speak after King and Abernathy were mysteriously released from jail in Albany, Georgia, 1962 July 12, WSB-TV newsfilm collection, reel 0156, 7:36/15:57, Walter J. Brown Media Archives and Peabody Awards Collection, The University of Georgia Libraries, Athens, Ga less
    • Partner
    • Walter J. Brown Media Archives and Peabody Awards Collection; Digital Library of Georgia
    • Contributing Institution
    • Walter J. Brown Media Archives and Peabody Awards Collection

  • WSB-TV newsfilm clip of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. speaking about nonviolence at an outdoor press conference after violence during a night march in Albany, Georgia, 1962 July 25.

    More info
    Select an item:
    WSB-TV newsfilm clip of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. speaking about nonviolence at an outdoor press conference after violence during a night march in Albany, Georgia, 1962 July 25
    • Date
    • 1962 July 25
    • Creator
    • WSB-TV (Television station : Atlanta, Ga.)
    • Description
    • In this WSB newsfilm clip, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., speaks at an outdoor press conference in Albany, Georgia, on Wednesday, July 25, 1962, addressing the previous night's altercation when angry onlookers began throwing rocks and bottles at t... more
      In this WSB newsfilm clip, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., speaks at an outdoor press conference in Albany, Georgia, on Wednesday, July 25, 1962, addressing the previous night's altercation when angry onlookers began throwing rocks and bottles at the police who were arresting demonstrators. While neither the demonstrators nor the leaders of the Albany Movement were violent during the disturbance, King says that the civil rights movement abhors violence so much that they are compelled to assume some responsibility for any destructive behavior of African Americans who were present. In response to the dispute, civil rights leaders declare a "day of penance" in which there will be no demonstrations and ask that those who adhere to nonviolent principles pray for those who have not yet assimilated them. King regrets that violence plays into the hands of segregationists, and that public officials are exploiting the outbreak "for their own political capital." King also announces afternoon plans to take a team disciplined in nonviolence into businesses, pool halls, and taverns of Albany's Harlem neighborhood to educate residents about appropriate nonviolent tactics and to encourage their practice. As explanations for the crowd's actions, King cites the July 23, 1962 beating of a pregnant Marion King, the pregnant wife of Slater King, no relation to Martin Luther King, by guards in Camilla, Georgia; and the April 15, 1962 slaying of Albany African American restaurant owner Walter Harris by local police. He avows, however, that these are not excuses. African Americans may develop a sense of discontent and at times bitterness after being the victims of so much violence. King states that although he believes that only a small minority of the activists have been violent, the movement will reconsider scheduling night demonstrations. Demonstrations at any time, day or night, will only resume if a commitment to nonviolence is demonstrated in the Albany community; King is optimistic that this will prove to be the case. less
    • Rights
    • Courtesy of Walter J. Brown Media Archives and Peabody Award Collection, The University of Georgia Libraries, Athens, Ga. Cite as: WSB-TV newsfilm clip of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. speaking about nonviolence at an outdoor press conference after vi... more
      Courtesy of Walter J. Brown Media Archives and Peabody Award Collection, The University of Georgia Libraries, Athens, Ga. Cite as: WSB-TV newsfilm clip of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. speaking about nonviolence at an outdoor press conference after violence during a night march in Albany, Georgia, 1962 July 25, WSB-TV newsfilm collection, reel 0899, 30:21/36:40, Walter J. Brown Media Archives and Peabody Awards Collection, The University of Georgia Libraries, Athens, Ga. less
    • Partner
    • Walter J. Brown Media Archives and Peabody Awards Collection; Digital Library of Georgia
    • Contributing Institution
    • Walter J. Brown Media Archives and Peabody Awards Collection

In November 1961, residents of Albany, Georgia launched an ambitious campaign to eliminate segregation in all facets of local life. The movement captured national attention one month later when local leaders invited Martin Luther King, Jr. to join the protest. Despite King's involvement, the movement failed to secure concessions from local officials and was consequently deemed unsuccessful by many observers. Subsequent appraisals, however, have identified the movement as a formative learning experience for King and other civil rights organizers, and credited it with hastening the ultimate desegregation of Albany's facilities, which occurred only one year following the movement's conclusion in August 1962.