• WSB-TV newsfilm clip of African American students--the "Little Rock Nine"--integrating Central High School and white students burning an effigy in protest in Little Rock, Arkansas, 1957 October 3.

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    WSB-TV newsfilm clip of African American students--the "Little Rock Nine"--integrating Central High School and white students burning an effigy in protest in Little Rock, Arkansas, 1957 October 3
    • Date
    • 1957 October 3
    • Creator
    • WSB-TV (Television station : Atlanta, Ga.)
    • Description
    • In this silent WSB newsfilm clip from October 3, 1957, African American students integrate Little Rock Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas; white students later leave the school in protest and hang and burn an effigy of a black student.
    • Rights
    • Courtesy of Walter J. Brown Media Archives and Peabody Award Collection, The University of Georgia Libraries, Athens, Ga. Cite as: WSB-TV newsfilm clip of African American students--the "Little Rock Nine"--integrating Central High School a... more
      Courtesy of Walter J. Brown Media Archives and Peabody Award Collection, The University of Georgia Libraries, Athens, Ga. Cite as: WSB-TV newsfilm clip of African American students--the "Little Rock Nine"--integrating Central High School and white students burning an effigy in protest in Little Rock, Arkansas, 1957 October 3, WSB-TV newsfilm collection, reel 0821, 12:28/13:26, Walter J. Brown Media Archives and Peabody Awards Collection, The University of Georgia Libraries, Athens, Ga. less
    • Partner
    • Walter J. Brown Media Archives and Peabody Awards Collection; Digital Library of Georgia
    • Contributing Institution
    • Walter J. Brown Media Archives and Peabody Awards Collection

  • General Assembly Committee on Schools, Sibley Commission.

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    General Assembly Committee on Schools, Sibley Commission
    • Date
    • 1960
    • Creator
    • Wilson, Bill (William Bryan), 1914-1993
    • Description
    • View of Atlanta attorney A. T. Walden speaking during the General Assembly Committee on Schools meeting in Atlanta, Georgia. In 1960, Georgia Governor Ernest Vandiver, Jr. was faced with a decision to either close public schools or comply with a fede... more
      View of Atlanta attorney A. T. Walden speaking during the General Assembly Committee on Schools meeting in Atlanta, Georgia. In 1960, Georgia Governor Ernest Vandiver, Jr. was faced with a decision to either close public schools or comply with a federal order to desegregate them. To avoid conflict with the federal government, He directed the Georgia General Assembly to create the General Assembly Committee on Schools. The committee was charged with gauging public sentiment regarding school desegregation and reporting back to the governor. Atlanta businessman John Sibley was selected to lead this effort, and therefore the committee was often referred to as the Sibley Commission. Although He believed in segregation, Sibley hoped to minimize support for massive resistance to school desegregation for practical reasons. He held ten public hearings across the state in which the debate was confined to two choices: continuing massive resistance at the expense of the school system or amending state law to allow token integration while keeping segregation largely intact. Most of those in attendance at the meetings supported total segregation of the schools. Sibley recommended that the state accept the federal decision to desegregate the schools despite the commission's findings. In January of 1961, Governor Vandiver introduced a bill that accepted the Sibley Commission's recommendations for desegregation. less
    • Rights
    • Courtesy of the Kenan Research Center at the Atlanta History Center. Cite as: Bill Wilson Photographs, Kenan Research Center, Atlanta History Center, Atlanta, Ga.
    • Partner
    • Atlanta History Center; Digital Library of Georgia
    • Contributing Institution
    • Atlanta History Center

Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas, gained national attention when Governor Orval Faubus mobilized the Arkansas National Guard to prevent integration.  President Dwight D. Eisenhower responded by federalizing the guard and removing it from Faubus's control, and ordering United States Army troops to oversee the integration. On September 25, 1957, the students, known as the “Little Rock Nine,” successfully integrated Central High School. 

Elsewhere across the nation in subsequent years, desegregation ensued, sometimes amid controversy although usually peacefully.  In 1960, Georgia governor Ernest Vandiver, Jr., faced with either closing public schools or complying with federal desegregation, directed the Georgia General Assembly to create the General Assembly Committee on Schools, which established the Sibley Commission to gauge public sentiment regarding school desegregation.

After extensive hearings, Atlanta businessman John Sibley recommended that the state accept the federal decision to desegregate the schools despite the commission's somewhat negative findings. In January of 1961, Vandiver introduced a bill accepting the Sibley Commission's recommendations for desegregation. Murphy High School was among the first all-white schools in Atlanta, Georgia to desegregate; the other schools were Brown High, Henry Grady High, and Northside High, all of whom admitted African American students on August 30, 1961.