Hubs

Become a Hub

Become a Hub

Hubs  /  Become a Hub

AMERICAN HISTORY AT YOUR FINGERTIPS


The DPLA would not exist without the collaboration of our content hubs and service hubs, the organizations that both contribute their content and metadata to the DPLA and aggregate it from their partners, the library, museum, archive, and cultural heritage institutions from across the US. Together, institutions throughout the US bring together millions of records about digital texts, photographs, manuscript materials, artwork and more available for use through the DPLA portal and API.

DPLA Hubs’ and their partners’ collections enjoy increased levels of discovery and use. Since joining DPLA, the Minnesota Digital Library has seen a 55% increase in visits and 62% in unique visitors. The Mountain West Digital Library has seen a bump of 105% in visits and 109% in unique visitors. This traffic is passed on to the contributing institutions that have shared content with these state-wide partners.

Read a full description of the DPLA content and service hub models »


How to become a DPLA Service Hub

If your organization is interested in becoming a service hub, please take the following steps:

  1. Read more about a service hub’s role.
  2. Determine if there is an existing service hub in your state (see our list of current partners). If so, please contact that hub to discuss becoming a partner.
  3. If your state or region does not have a service hub, please determine if there is an existing digital collaborative (check this list of collaborative digitization programs in the United States as a starting place).
  4. Contact leader(s) of existing collaborations to discuss how you might partner with them to build off of the existing program.
  5. Consider sustainability—is your organization able to host thousands (and potentially hundreds of thousands) of records and/our digital resources? Can you commit to bringing on new partners, managing their metadata, and ensuring the longevity of this program?
  6. Gain agreement from all partners that their metadata is in the public domain (or that you/they will designate all metadata as public domain through a Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication, known as a CC0 designation).
  7. Agree that you will act as mediator and/or work to edit, enhance, and otherwise globalize partner metadata, and ensure that all metadata records resolve to a digital objects (online texts, photographs, manuscript material, art work, etc.) and comply with a national standard (Dublin Core, MODS, etc.).
  8. Be willing to share those records and associated content previews (thumbnails, clips, etc.) with DPLA in accordance with the Data Exchange Agreement, which describes how hubs provide data to the DPLA, and how the DPLA uses this data.
  9. Ensure that your collection development plan is inclusive of records that describe national and international resources, as well as those of local, statewide, and regional interest.

Once you’ve taken these steps, please contact the DPLA content staff (content@dp.la) to discuss your organization’s potential role as a service hub and your ability to make the commitments outlined above.


How to become a DPLA Content Hub

If your organization currently has an active feed to at least 200,000 metadata records that resolve to digital objects (online texts, photographs, manuscript material, art work, etc.) and is interested in becoming a content hub, please take the following steps:

  1. Read more about a content hub’s role.
  2. Agree that you will work to edit, enhance, and otherwise globalize metadata.
  3. Ensure that at least 200,000 metadata records resolve to a digital objects (online texts, photographs, manuscript material, art work, etc.) and comply with a national standard (Dublin Core, MODS, etc.).
  4. Be willing to share those records and associated content previews (thumbnails, clips, etc.) with DPLA in accordance with the Data Exchange Agreement, which describes how Hubs provide data to the DPLA, and how the DPLA uses this data.
  5. Ensure that your collection development plan is inclusive of records that describe national and international resources, as well as those of local, statewide, and regional interest.

If your organization is interested in becoming a content hub, and you meet the criteria above, please contact the DPLA content staff (content@dp.la) to discuss ingest procedures and schedules.


My organization doesn’t meet the criteria for Service or Content Hub

If your organization is interested in contributing content to DPLA, but you do not meet the requirements above, please check to see if there is a service hub in your state or region. If there is, contact them—they want to hear from you!

If there is not a service hub in your state or region, contact your State Library, State Archives, and other large cultural heritage institutions in your region to see if conversations about building a service hub have already begun. If they haven’t, start one! Once you’ve got a working group together, contact us to set up a webinar.


Data Exchange Agreement and Data Use Best Practices

The DPLA Data Exchange Agreement describes how hubs provide data to the DPLA, and how the DPLA uses this data. Prospective hubs can obtain a copy of the Data Exchange Agreement by contacting the DPLA content staff at content@dp.la. The Data Use Best Practices (PDF) suggest guidelines for others who are interested in using the aggregated data provided by DPLA in the spirit of building a community of practice that recognizes contributions.

Technical Considerations

The DPLA Metadata Application Profile (MAP) v3 allows DPLA to accommodate existing and emerging data models for library, archive, and museum resources. Metadata from the hubs is harvested using OAI-PMH, along with other techniques, mapped to the DPLA schema, and made available through the DPLA portal and as a dataset via the API. In addition to the DPLA portal, a number of tools to help users access and view the metadata content are being developed by independent developers using the API. As part of the initial launch, DPLA and its service hub partners have created a number of virtual exhibitions using the Omeka platform that feature content from the hubs’ digital collections.

You can read more about the DPLA MAP in a short white paper — “An introduction to the DPLA metadata model” — which offers a detailed introduction to the DPLA MAP, describes how we harvest metadata, and outlines the types of metadata that our partners provide us.